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The Complete Vegetarian: The Essential Guide to Good Health
Edited by Peggy Carlson, MD


C218
30 CPEUs
HARD COPY

$189.95 $159.95
REDUCED
Save $30.00

Book, 361pgs and Study Guide with 1 Reporting Form, 36 pgs.
This program will assist you in counseling clients and patients who have chosen a low carbohydrate way of eating, and to provide a wealth of practical information and support for you and your clients. Upon completion of this accredited, self-directed learning program you will be able to:

  • Create meal plans appropriate for lacto-ovo vegetarian and vegan diets
  • Discuss how to reference the Vegetarian Food Guide Pyramid for planning food and portions to supply the necessary nutrients
  • State the dietary components in a vegetarian diet that protect against disease
  • State the rationale for vegetarian diets in preventing or helping to treat coronary artery disease (CAD)
  • Identify the components of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet that help to lower blood pressure
  • Calculate the amount of protein recommended at different ages and activity (exercise) levels
  • Explain the relationship between adequate blood glucose control and changes in LDL cholesterol and triglyceride level for diabetics
  • Calculate the percentage of calories from protein, fat, saturated fat, and carbohydrate in a given diet and contrast these with the recommendation from the American Diabetes Association

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To order an ADDITIONAL Reporting Form click below:

C218F
30 CPEUs
REPORTING FORM
$50.00

The Complete Vegetarian: The Essential Guide to Good Health
Edited by Peggy Carlson, MD

Copyright 2011 Wolf Rinke Associates, Inc. All rights reserved for this self-directed, accredited learning program. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission from the publisher is prohibited.

CUSTOMER COMMENTS

Linda Jadach: "The book was excellent and included many recent studies concerning vegetarian intake effects on nutrient intake and health status. It helped update me on the recent information we found about vegetarian intake and also related the intake to environment."

Ellyn Field: "It taught me all I needed to know about helping clients be vegetarian."

INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW

Welcome to The Complete Vegetarian Study Guide, a self-directed accredited learning program. This program consists of a book of the same title edited by Peggy Carlson, MD and this study guide.

This program is designed to provide you with a wide range of information to assist you in working with clients and patients who have a variety of nutritional concerns, to assist you in any writing, media work, or presentations on nutrition topics, and to provide you with a wealth of practical information and support for you and your clients.

This learning program is approved for 30 continuing professional education units (CPEUs). It is a Level 2 Continuing Professional Education (CPE) program, meaning that the reader has general knowledge of the literature and professional practice within the areas covered. The focus of the program is to enhance knowledge and application when working with clients or the media.

To get the most out of this self-directed accredited learning program, it is suggested that you adhere to the following four steps:
Step 1: Review the objectives in this study guide.
Step 2: Read and study The Complete Vegetarian book.
Step 3: Assess what you have learned by answering the questions contained in this study guide.
Step 4: Compare your answers to the answer key provided in this study guide. If you score at least 80% correct, you are ready to transfer your answers to the CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION (CPEU) REPORTING FORM. If you scored less than 80% correct, re-read this learning program until you score at least 80% correct.

After you have successfully completed the program complete the CPEU REPORTING FORM and
Mail to: Wolf Rinke Associates, Inc., 13621 Gilbride Lane, Clarksville, MD 21029,
Or fax to: (410) 531-9282,
Or submit on-line at www.easyCPEcredits.com.

We will e-mail your Certificate of Completion.
When you submit your CPEU Reporting Form to us via mail, fax or www.easyCPEcredits.com, be sure to write your correct email address in the space provided on the CPE Reporting Form. If writing by hand, be sure to print your e-mail address clearly.

To ensure that our e-mails are delivered to your inbox (instead of your junk/spam folders), please add cpesupport@wolfrinke.com to your Address Book or Safe List of allowed email senders. Also, be sure to allow attachments from this email address.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this accredited, self-directed learning program you will be able to:

  • Create meal plans appropriate for lacto-ovo vegetarian and vegan diets
  • Describe the different dietary choices for the types of vegetarian diets
  • Discuss how to reference the Vegetarian Food Guide Pyramid for planning food and portions to supply the necessary nutrients
  • List the indispensible amino acids and discuss the protein "building" capability of the human body, without the need for "combining proteins" at each meal
  • State the dietary components in a vegetarian diet that protect against disease
  • Discuss the reasons individuals choose to eat a vegetarian diet
  • Explain the environmental impact of raising animals for human consumption
  • State the rationale for vegetarian diets in preventing or helping to treat coronary artery disease (CAD)
  • Identify the ranges for desirable, and borderline high blood values for cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides according to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP)
  • Explain the effect of diet on the formation of atherosclerotic plaques
  • Discuss vegetarians' lower mortality from CAD
  • Specify the relationship between an increase in serum cholesterol and the increase in the risk of CAD
  • Discuss how saturated fats and trans fat have a larger effect on serum cholesterol compared to dietary cholesterol intake
  • Identify the main dietary sources of saturated fats, trans fats, and cholesterol
  • Differentiate between the functions of HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol
  • Explain the direct relationship between LDL cholesterol and the risk of CAD
  • Identify the ideal ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol
  • Discuss how the substitution of polyunsaturated fats and monounsaturated fat for saturated fats can lower total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol
  • List dietary sources of polyunsaturated fats and monounsaturated fats
    State the percent of total calories from fat that the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends
  • Enumerate the benefit of soy foods in relation to cardiovascular health and kidney function
  • List the dietary sources of soy
  • Discuss the functions of the omega 3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA
  • Explain how the body converts alpha-linolenic acid to EPA and DHA and list good dietary sources of alpha-linolenic acid
  • Explain the relationship between homocysteine and the risk of CAD
  • Discuss dietary factors that affect homocysteine levels
  • List dietary sources of folate, magnesium, calcium, vitamin B12, iron, zinc, and vitamin C
  • Categorize the ranges of Body Mass Index as normal, overweight or obese
  • Elucidate the different experimental designs for studying the effects of diet on health;
  • State the amount of cancer deaths linked to diet according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the American Cancer Society (ACS)
  • Enumerate how dietary components can affect the development or spread of cancer;
  • State the recommended amount of fiber and list sources of soluble and insoluble fiber;
  • Differentiate between the types of dietary fiber and their functions
  • Recommend foods and portion sizes to meet the recommended amount of fiber;
  • Enumerate the hypotheses of how dietary fiber protects against colon cancer
  • List the cooking methods and specific compounds in processed foods that increase the risk of stomach and colon cancer
  • Discuss the relationship between an increased potassium intake from foods and the decreased need for antihypertensive medication
  • Identify the components of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet that help to lower blood pressure
  • State the percentage of American children who are vegetarians
  • Identify the different RDAs for iron in vegetarian children compared to non-vegetarian children
  • Enumerate the dietary factors that inhibit iron absorption
  • Differentiate between heme and non-heme iron
  • Identify foods that enhance iron absorption
  • Calculate the amount of protein recommended at different ages and activity (exercise) levels
  • List sources of protein in the vegetarian diet, and in the vegan diet; state the portions to consume in order to meet the recommendations
  • Discuss the importance of vitamin B12 intake in vegans
  • Identify the RDA for calcium in children at various ages
  • Explain the relationship between adequate blood glucose control and changes in LDL cholesterol and triglyceride level for diabetics
  • Discuss the reduction in serious complications with adequate glycemic control
  • Calculate the percentage of calories from protein, fat, saturated fat, and carbohydrate in a given diet and contrast these with the recommendation from the American Diabetes Association
  • Discuss the important benefits of a high carbohydrate, high fiber diet for diabetics
  • Determine the calorie, carbohydrate, and protein levels appropriate for female athletes in different categories of activity/intensity level
  • Describe the negative effects of inadequate caloric intake for athletes
  • Discuss the functions of carbohydrate related to exercise
  • Discuss the need for carbohydrate, fluid, sodium, and potassium replacement after long exercise sessions
  • Discuss the increased need for specific nutrients during pregnancy and lactation

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. Introduction
Peggy Carlson, MD
Vegetarians
History of Vegetarian Diets
Diets around the World
History of the "Western" or "Affluent" Diet
History of Scientific Research into Diet-Related Diseases
Conclusion
References
2. Protein
Virginia Messina, MPH, RD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
3. Fats
Brenda Davis, RD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
4. Fiber
Peggy Carlson, MD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
5. Iron
Dina Aronson, MS, RD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion--Vegetarians:At Risk, or Having an Edge?
References
6. Calcium and Vitamin D
Suzanne Havala Hobbs, DrPH, MS, RD John J.B.Anderson, PhD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
7. Vitamin B12
Michael A. Klaper, MD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
8. Zinc
Virginia Messina, MPH, RD Reed Mangels, PhD, RD, FADA
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
9. Other Vitamins and Minerals
Reed Mangels, PhD, RD, FADA
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
10. Heart Disease
Peggy Carlson, MD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
11. Cancer
Peggy Carlson, MD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature: Cancer Rates among Vegetarians
The Relationship Between Diet and Cancer
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
12. Hypertension
James Craner, MD, MPH
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
13. Stroke
Peggy Carlson, MD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
14. Obesity and a Vegetarian Diet
Sudha Raj, PhD, RD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
15. Diabetes and Vegetarian Diets
Peggy Carlson, MD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects: How to Plan a Vegetarian Diet for Diabetics
Conclusion
References
16. Osteoporosis
John J.B.Anderson, PhD
Suzanne Havala Hobbs, DrPH, MS, RD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
Acknowledgments
References
17. Gallbladder Disease, Diverticulitis, Appendicitis, Kidney Stones, and Kidney Failure
Valerie Kurtzhalts, MSN,APRN, BC Peggy Carlson, MD
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
18. Vegetarian Diets and Children
Jeanene Fogli, MS, RD, LDN Carol M. Meerschaert, RD, LDN
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
19. Pregnancy and Lactation
Reed Mangels, PhD, RD, FADA
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
20. Optimal Nutrition for Active Vegetarians and Vegetarian Athletes
D. Enette Larson-Meyer, PhD, RD, FACSM Mary Helen Niemeyer, MD, MPH, FAAFP
Introduction
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
21. Environmental and Food Safety Aspects of Vegetarian Diets
Carl V. Phillips, MPP, PhD Simon K. Emms, PhD Erin L Kraker, MS, REHS
Introduction
Types of Animal Food Production
A Variety of Environmental Impacts
Summary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
Acknowledgment
References
22. Planning Nutritious Vegetarian Diets
Cheryl Sullivan, MA, RD
IntroductionSummary of the Scientific Literature
Practical Aspects
Conclusion
References
23. Conclusion: Summary of Protective Factors
Virginia Messina, MPH, RD Peggy Carlson, MD
Factors in Vegetarian Diets That Are Protective
Vegetarian Diets May Be More Healthful Because of Lower Intakes of These Factors
Conclusion
Contributors Index

ABOUT THE EDITOR OF THE BOOK

Peggy Carlson, MD, is an emergency medicine physician with a background in occupational medicine. She lives in Fairfax, Virginia.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR OF THE STUDY GUIDE

Peggy Jensen, RD, MBA completed her dietetic internship at Massachusetts General Hospital and has more than twenty-five years experience as a registered dietitian. She has worked as a hospital-based, clinical dietitian, and coordinated a nutrition education program for the American Heart Association in New York. She has appeared on several cable television shows discussing healthy eating, shopping, and cooking. She is a contributing nutrition consultant for the recently published The 10 Best Questions for Recovering from a Heart Attack. Ms. Jensen currently works as an educator and nutrition consultant in private practice in Virginia.

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