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Complementary and Alternative Therapies Modulating Cardiometabolic Syndrome Risk Factors
V. Juturu, PhD, FACN


C192
16 CPEUs
HARD COPY
Discontinued
C192E
16 CPEUs
ELECTRONIC
$99.95
 

This manual (203 pgs) will enable you to:

  • evaluate the role of risk factors in contributing to cardiovascular disease
  • assess the associated complications of cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS)
  • explain lifestyle modifications as first-line therapy for CMS
  • apply complementary and alternative therapy options to manage CMS risk factors
  • discuss the effects of herbs containing stimulants on CMS risk factors
  • evaluate adverse effects of complementary and alternative therapies
  • recommend dietary supplements to manage CMS risk factors
  • assess complementary therapies for CMS and its adverse effects in health and disease
  • discuss recommendations for bioactive food components for CMS
  • recognize interactions of alternative therapies and cardiovascular drugs
  • utilize cardiovascular disease risk assessment methods
  • implement American Heart Association Evidence Based Guidelines and quality health care improvement and risk reduction strategies

For more information and customer comments, click here.

Approved by CDR, CBDM

For RDs & DTRs: Suggested Learning Need Codes for the Prof. Dev. Portfolio
2000, 2010, 2090, 3000, 3070, 3100, 4000, 4040, 5000, 5110, 5120, 5150, 5160, 5200, 5220, 5230, 5240, 5260, 5370, 5420, 5460


Complementary and Alternative Therapies
Modulating Cardiometabolic Syndrome Risk Factors

V. Juturu, PhD, FACN

© 2008 Wolf Rinke Associates, Inc. All rights reserved for this self-directed accredited learning program. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission, except for brief excerpts, is prohibited.

CUSTOMER COMMENTS

Beverly Kapple: "Quick, easy, geared to adult education & training."

Nancy Dell-Cannata "Up to date, interesting topic."

OVERVIEW AND INTRODUCTION

Welcome to Complementary and Alternative Therapies Modulating Cardiometabolic Syndrome Risk Factors, a self-directed, accredited learning program. When selecting complementary and alternative therapies, the nutrition professional needs to evaluate all the possible options. Herbal remedies, vitamins and minerals are each considered dietary supplements by the FDA, they do not have the same rigorous testing and labeling process as over-the-counter and prescription medications. Some of these substances, including products labeled as "natural," a term with no government approved definition, have drug-like effects that can be dangerous. Certain vitamins and minerals can cause problems when taken in excessive amounts. While some changes to federal labeling guidelines have helped protect consumers by requiring manufacturers to evaluate the identity, purity, strength, and composition of dietary supplements. healthcare providers still need to carefully investigate potential benefits and side effects before making recommendations to their patients.
This self-directed, accredited learning program will provide you with detailed information that will enable you to evaluate the beneficial effects and safety of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy to reduce cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) risk factors including:
Evaluating and assessing the modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors of CMS.
Assessing the possible complications of CMS.
Evaluating the beneficial and safety effects of complementary therapies.
Planning, recommending and implementing CAM therapy to reduce risk factors of CMS along with lifestyle modifications to maintain quality health care.
This learning program is designed to help you earn 16 continuing professional education units (CPEUs). It is a category 2 Continuing Professional Education (CPE) program, meaning that the reader has general knowledge of the literature and professional experience within the area covered. The focus of the program is to enhance knowledge and application.
To get the most out of this program, it is suggested that you follow these four steps:
Step 1: Read the material presented in each of the chapters.
Step 2: When you come to an example, stop for a moment and work out the answers using pen and paper.
Step 3: Assess what you have learned by completing the self-assessment instrument contained at the end of the learning program.
Step 4: Compare your answers to the answer key contained at the end of the learning program. If you score at least 80% correct, you have completed this program and are ready to transfer your answers to the CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REPORTING FORM. If you scored less than 80% correct, re-read the learning program until you score at least 80% correct.
After you have successfully completed the program complete the CPE CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REPORTING FORM and
Mail to: Wolf Rinke Associates, Inc., 13621 Gilbride Lane, Clarksville, MD 21029,
Or Fax to: (410) 531-9282,
Or submit On-line at www.easyCPEcredits.com
Once we receive your successfully completed CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REPORTING FORM we will send you a certificate of completion.
Happy Learning!
Vijaya Juturu., Ph.D., F.A.C.N.

GOAL AND OBJECTIVES


Goal
To provide you with practical information that will enable you to apply complementary and alternative therapy options to manage cardiometabolic syndrome modifiable risk factors.

Educational Objectives

Upon the completion of this accredited, self-directed learning program you should be able to:

  • Evaluate the role of risk factors in contributing to cardiovascular disease.
  • Assess the associated complications of cardiometabolic syndrome.
  • Explain the importance of lifestyle modifications as first-line therapy for cardiometabolic syndrome.
  • Apply complementary and alternative therapy options to manage cardiometabolic syndrome modifiable risk factors.
  • Discuss the effects of herbs containing stimulants on cardiometabolic risk factors.
  • Evaluate potential adverse effects of complementary and alternative therapies.
  • Recommend dietary supplements to manage cardiometabolic risk factors.
  • Assess complementary therapies for cardiometabolic syndrome and its adverse effects in health and disease.
  • Discuss recommendations for bioactive food components for cardiometabolic syndrome and its risk factors.
  • Recognize potential interactions of alternative therapies and cardiovascular drugs.
  • Utilize Cardiovascular Disease risk assessment methods.
  • Implement American Heart Association Evidence Based Guidelines and quality health care improvement and risk reduction strategies.

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter I: Cardiometabolic Syndrome 1
    Prevalence of Cardiometabolic Syndrome 2

    Chapter II: Cardiometabolic Syndrome Risk Factors 5
    Non-Modifiable Risk Factors 5
    Age 5
    Gender 6
    Height 7
    Race 8
    Family History 9
    Modifiable Risk Factors 10
    Body Mass Index 10
    Intra Abdominal Obesity 12
    Smoking 13
    Alcohol 15
    Lipids and Lipoproteins 16
    LDL Oxidation 17
    Diabetes 19
    Prediabetes 19
    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus 22
    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus 22
    Gestational Diabetes Mellitus 23
    Other Specific Types of Diabetes 24
    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome 25
    Obesity 26
    Childhood Obesity 26
    Adult Obesity/Abdominal Obesity 32
    Blood Pressure 33
    Vascular Endothelial Function 36
    Coronary Circulation 37
    Peripheral Circulation 37
    C-Reactive Protein 38
    Homocysteine 39
    Stress 40

    Chapter III: Cardiometabolic Syndrome Associated Complications 43
    Heart Rate Abnormalities 43
    Hemostatic and Inflammatory Markers 43
    Fibrinogen 45
    von Willebrand Factor Antigen 45
    Tissue Plasminogen Activator 46
    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 46
    Factor VII 48
    Cytokines 48
    Hyperuricemia 49
    Depression 49
    Microalbuminuria 51
    Aldosterone 52

    Chapter IV: Complementary and Alternative Therapies 55
    Whole Medical Systems 55
    Homeopathic Medicine 57
    Crataegus and Pumpan (Hawthorn) 57
    Naturopathic Medicine 58
    Traditional Chinese Medicine 58
    Ayurvedic Medicine 61
    Mind-Body Medicine 63
    Transcendental Meditation 65
    Tai Chi 68
    Bioenergetics (Energy Medicine) 70
    Acupuncture 70
    Relaxation 71
    Yoga 72
    Biofield Therapies 73
    Qi Gong 73
    Reiki 73
    Healing and Therapeutic Touch 74
    Distance Healing 74
    Applied Kinesiology 75
    Meditation 75
    Spirituality 76
    Vibrational Medicine 77
    Magnetotherapy 77
    Manipulative and Body Based Therapies 78
    Massage 78
    Chiropractic 79
    Osteopathic Manipulation 80
    Biologically Based Medicines 80
    Omega-3 Fatty Acids/Fish Oils 80
    Plant Sterols and Stanols, Soy Protein and Isoflavones 88
    Cocoa 92
    Oats 94
    Psyllium 95
    Garlic 96
    Fenugreek 97
    Policosanol 97
    Herbal Nutrients 98
    Danshen 101
    Gugulipid 102
    Hawthorn Berry Fruit Extract 103
    Brindleberry 105
    Tomatoes 105
    Blueberries 106
    Gymnema Sylvestre 106
    Cayenne 107
    Ginger 107
    Gotu Kola 107
    Onion 108
    Dietary Supplements 108
    Antioxidants 111
    Vitamin E 111
    Tocotrienol 112
    Chromium 112
    Ginseng 113
    Other Plants 113
    Weight Control Substances 113
    Polyphenols and Dietary flavonoids 114
    Coenzyme Q 10 115

    Chapter V: Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment 117
    Framingham Risk Score Assessment Tool 117
    The Reynolds Risk Score 121

    Chapter VI: AHA Evidence-Based Guidelines 125
    Quality Health Care: CMS Improvement and Risk Reduction in Men and Women 126

    Conclusions 131
    References 133
    For Your Continued Learning 153
    Resources 155
    List of Abbreviations 159
    Glossary 161
    Self-Assessment Questions 173
    Answer Key 195
    Explanation of Answers 197
    About The Author 205
    About Wolf Rinke Associates, Inc 207

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Vijaya Juturu is currently working as Director of Scientific Affairs at Nutrition 21, Inc. in Purchase, NY. Dr. Juturu has a Doctoral degree in Clinical Nutrition (Cardiovascular Nutrition) from S.V. University in India (1996) and completed her Post Doctoral Research in Cardiovascular Nutrition at Penn State University (1997-2000). Her main research interests include cardiometabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, coronary heart disease, phytoestrogens, functional foods, cardiovascular physiology, lipid metabolism, insulin signaling transduction, vascular biology and nutraceuticals. She is the recipient of the 2008 Dr. Mark Bieber Award from the American College of Nutrition-a distinguished award given for accomplishments in nutrition; the 2008 Dr. Tinsley R. Harrison Award from The Society of Clinical Investigation (SSCI) and the American Journal of Medical Sciences; the Young Scientist Award given by the Indian Society of Atherosclerosis Research in 1995; and the Indian Medical Scientist Award in Nutritional Sciences, given by the Indian Council of Medical Research in 1997. She received the Diabetes Education Stipend Award in 2005 and the Diabetes Care Education and Professional Excellance Award in 2007 from the Nutrition in Complementary Care DPGs of the American Dietetic Association (ADA). She is the author of several publications including patents, book chapters, and submissions of qualified health claims. She is an invited author, reviewer and editorial board member for several reputed journals. She was nominated as Resources and Development Chair for the Medical Nutrition Practice Group of ADA, is working as an EAL analyst for ADA, and is involved in a women's working group committee of the American Diabetes Association. Dr. Juturu is a member of numerous professional organizations including the American Diabetes Association, AHA, American Society for Nutritional Sciences, American College of Nutrition, and the American Oil Chemists Society. She is a consultant of the United Soy Bean Board, and a Fellow of the American College of Nutrition (F.A.C.N.). She resides in New York with her husband and daughter.

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